Are You Genuinely Happy For Others?

I have two boys. Tanner is 10 years old and Drew is 8. They are best friends. Last year they become obsessed with American Ninja Warrior. Everything in our house became an obstacle and we soon found a ninja gym near our house for them to attend classes. Last month both boys competed in an area competition, Drew in the 6-9 age group and Tanner in the 10-11 age group. They both did great, but Drew qualified for regionals and Tanner did not.  Last Saturday Tanner and I went with Drew to support him in his regional competition. Drew did great and qualified for Nationals! It was so cool to watch but that’s not what I was most proud of on Saturday.  I watched Tanner cheer on Drew without a hint of jealousy, just genuine excitement. I actually had two different parents comment on how sweet of a brother he
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Go Serve Someone

On Tuesday I was running late to the airport.   I decided to park inside to be closer, but there was an attendant at the gate that said it was full and I had to go to the economy parking. I took the trip around the airport to get back to the economy parking and struggled to find a spot. After parking a long ways away from any of the bus stops I ran to catch a bus I could see in the distance only to find it was full. I waited another 5 minutes for the next bus as I got the notification that my flight was boarding. The second bus came and there was room. I got in ready to zoom to the terminal but there were several elderly passengers with wheel chairs, walkers and canes that all had to get off. At this point my anxiety was
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Why Do Leaders Fail?

One of the speakers I brought to The Leadership Inc Institute last year was Dr. Clinton Longnecker. Dr. Longenecker discussed leadership with a group of 50 leaders from various companies in Salt Lake City, UT. One of the fascinating discussions stemmed from the question, Why Do Leaders Fail?   There are probably a myriad of answers as to why leaders fail, but I want to boil it down to three “ins” that need to be out. 1.Incongruency 2. Incompetency 3. Inconsistency   Incongruency – when leaders are not congruent they erode their influence and create distrust. We see this when a leader’s actions are contrary to their words; when the expectations or standards don’t apply to themselves, or when they don’t live the values they profess. To avoid failure in this area, leaders need to practice what they preach and set an example that people can follow.   Incompetency –
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Effort Is A Skill

On Nov 14 in the NBA the Jimmy Butler saga ended when the Minnesota Timberwolves trader Butler to the Philadelphia 76ers for Robert Covington and Dario Saric. If you aren’t a basketball fan, Butler was demanding a trade and it turned into an ugly ordeal. The interesting thing has been how much better the Timberwolves have been since the trade. A big reason for the uptick is the addition of Robert Covington. Covington is a skilled player but nobody would argue he’s more skilled than Jimmy Butler. What he brings to the table is an intangible that’s hard to measure. He brings energy. He is a guy on the court that plays hard on every play. Cheers on his teammates. Dives for loose balls and his energy is contagious – he raises the collective energy of the team. Here is my takeaway – Effort is a skill. And just like
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19 Life Lessons

A couple of weeks ago I interviewed Nuskin Founder & Chairman Steve Lund for my podcast. In the interview we talked a little bit about s mutual friend of ours who passed away several years ago named Richard Ellis. Richard Ellis was a successful entrepreneur, father and friend. He touched thousands of people’s lives with his wisdom, understanding and caring. Just before he passed, he shared 19 Life Lessons with some of the people he loved and I wanted to share them with you because I think there is great wisdom in each of these. 1. You won’t always succeed, but never give up believing in yourself. 2. Look for the success lesson of any failure. There is a hint there. 3. Be inspired by your mentors and leaders, but never controlled. 4. Personal growth will always precede relationship and business growth. 5. Believe and trust in other people until
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10 Benefits To Reading

This week my twelve year old daughter put together a neighborhood mini library. She got the approval of the Home Owners Association. Found the right spot for the library. Solicited book donations and had a launch party.   It was awesome watching all the neighborhood kids grabbing books and sitting and reading together.   I am a big fan of reading. I know that as an author that sounds trite, but reading has allowed me to continue to grow and learn.   There are some cliché sayings thrown around like: Leaders are Readers and Earners are Learners. But these clichés certainly have merit.   Here are some of the benefits of reading:   1.According to Bite Size Bio, reading for one hour a day about your profession for seven years makes you an international expert in your field.        Not only does this take a lot of discipline, but very few colleagues
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There Is No Substitute For Hard Work

When I was 8 years old, my brother (age 10) and I started a paper route. We had to get up everyday of the year, without exceptions, at 5 am and deliver around 100 newspapers. Rain, snow, and exhaustion didn’t matter- the papers had to be delivered. So we did it everyday for four years.   Having this responsibility at a young age taught me how to work hard, be consistent and follow through even when I didn’t feel like it.   My mom recently sent me this letter she found from one of our customers and it reminded me how much learning how to work hard with a paper route has served me throughout my life.   Learning how to work is an invaluable lesson to learn. I’ve been able to take the lessons I learned from that paper route and apply them to everything I’ve endeavored to do.
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Two Keys To Success

I was listening to a podcast where CJ McCollum (shooting guard for the Portland Trailblazers) was talking to Brian Koppelman (filmmaker who wrote and produced Rounders, Oceans 13 & his current show, Billions) Brian made a great point that two of the keys to success are: Being present Being comfortable in your own skin Being present is harder & harder in our busy, technology driven world & for that reason it is even more important. Being present with the people you are with is crucial to connection but being present in your work is also crucial to your effectiveness. Learning to eliminate distractions, turn down the noise & focus are skills of the highly successful. Being comfortable in your own skin is harder to teach. It eludes many people and their can be many reasons for that. I don’t know all the answers but a couple things that help are:
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Plus, Minus and Equal

The four-time undefeated MMA champion now MMA trainer, Frank Shamrock, has developed a system for training would-be fighters. I’m not a huge MMA fan – but I think there is a lot of merit to his system. The system is called “+, -, =”. Shamrock’s theory is that in order to be the best, you need to work with someone better than you, someone equal to you and someone whom you can teach. Shamrock believes this builds the best fighters. We certainly don’t have to be an MMA fighter to benefit from this system. The same can be applied to us in any scenario. Training with someone better than us pushes us past our limits and helps us see greater possibilities. Training with our equal tests our skills and in the process they become a peer, allow us to create cooperation, shared learning and has a mastermind effect. Teaching allows
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