Tell A Good Story (Shark Tank Tip #5)

I am a huge proponent of telling a good story. As the author of The Power of Storytelling and a speech coach – this is one area that personally resonates with me. It is also a key strategy to influence the Sharks or any prospect or audience when you are presenting. So – the fifth presentation tip from Shark Tank is – Tell a Good Story. In the first post we learned to personalize your presentation. In post two we discovered that people buy you. In post three we recognized the importance of knowing your numbers. And the fourth post presented the idea that Samples Sell. Today’s post is going to dissect telling a good story. People love stories and great presenters are great storytellers. Their stories add context, drive emotion and make your presentation memorable. In this post I am not going to dive into all the aspect of
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How To Tell A Story That Moves People

(Book Excerpt From The Power of Storytelling – https://bit.ly/17T5ctj) Great storytellers focus on the audience. They have done their homework, they know who they are speaking to, and they pay close attention to how the audience is responding, whether through their words, their laughter, or through their eyes and body language. Only when you truly know your audience can you make your message about them. That is what creates influence, and the most important facet of making it about them is to tie your message into their primary motivations. If you find out what drives them, what their hot button is, and make your message align with that drive, you are golden. Researchers have identified four primary categories that motivate people. I call them the four P’s: Pleasure, Prestige, Payoff, Productivity. As we examine them, it’s easy to see how each has universal appeal. Pleasure – People naturally seek enjoyment.
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How To Engage Your Audience/Prospect

(Book Excerpt from The Power of Storytelling – https://bit.ly/17T5ctj) As an influencer your purpose is to do one thing: engage the audience. What do you think it means to engage? According to Webster’s, to engage means to cause someone to be involved; to attract their attention; to engross them. If you are teaching, leading, selling or speaking, your purpose is to engage your audience. Above all, you want to grab their attention and get them involved. Your prospect, client, customer, employee, team member, or student has to be engaged or they won’t buy your product, act on your idea or implement your plan. Without engagement, there is no influence. In the spirit of engagement, I believe that we should move from giving sales presentations to having sales conversations. There’s a huge difference between the two. A sales presentation, by definition, is a monologue, while a sales conversation is a dialogue–it
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