How To Tell A Story That Moves People

(Book Excerpt From The Power of Storytelling – https://bit.ly/17T5ctj) Great storytellers focus on the audience. They have done their homework, they know who they are speaking to, and they pay close attention to how the audience is responding, whether through their words, their laughter, or through their eyes and body language. Only when you truly know your audience can you make your message about them. That is what creates influence, and the most important facet of making it about them is to tie your message into their primary motivations. If you find out what drives them, what their hot button is, and make your message align with that drive, you are golden. Researchers have identified four primary categories that motivate people. I call them the four P’s: Pleasure, Prestige, Payoff, Productivity. As we examine them, it’s easy to see how each has universal appeal. Pleasure – People naturally seek enjoyment.
Continue Reading

Presentation Advice From NY Times Bestseller – Terri Sjodin

Today’s post comes from my friend and NY Times Bestselling Author, Terri Sjodin. Presentation Advice from Terri Sjodin : Q. “I need to craft a great presentation for an upcoming meeting. They only gave me 15 minutes, I normally need an hour – What should I do?” A. This question is more common than you might think. And in today’s competitive market, no business skill is more important than being able to share your message, and get to the point –quickly. The solution depends on your ability to “self-edit” and apply a tight analysis of your content- keeping the best parts of your message, and dropping the unnecessary…while still giving a rock solid talk. One of my favorite quotes addressing the challenge of “self-editing” comes from Winston Churchill… If you want me to speak for 2 minutes, it will take me three weeks of preparation. If you want me to
Continue Reading

A Communication Lesson From Jerry Seinfeld

Jerry Seinfeld is one of the most recognized comedians in the world. In the early 90s it was Jerry’s comedy that spearheaded the popularity of observational humor. Here are a few of his funny observations: • According to most studies, people’s number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. Death is number two. Does that sound right? This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you’re better off in the casket than doing the eulogy. • I was the best man at the wedding. If I’m the best man, why is she marrying him? • It’s amazing that the amount of news that happens in the world every day always just exactly fits the newspaper. Jerry is a great comedian and a great communicator and he taught a great lesson on communication when he said, “I will spend an hour taking an eight word
Continue Reading