8 Tips That Will Make Your Presentations Great

I spent one day and a half with eight executives from a national association helping them develop their presentation skills. We dissected every aspect of presenting from how you open to how you close. We worked on storytelling, creating engagement and adding humor. I had them speak in front of their peers and we filmed them, critiqued them and improved together. Here are the Top 8 Tips (according to the executives) That Will Make Your Presentations Great. 1. Focus on the audience. Forget perfection in your presentation and aim for connection with your audience. 2. Develop your presentation and then your power point. Remember your power point is meant to support your message – it is not your presentation. 3. Turn you presentation into a conversation by adding “You” focused questions. (Questions that contain the word “You” making it about the audience) 4. Craft stories that are struggle to solution.
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Four Reasons Leaders Are Readers

I was recently in the CEO’s office of a billion dollar company and on his desk were a stack of books. I asked him what he was reading and with excitement he grabbed a book and told me all about it. Then on a plane ride home, I was seated next to the Vice President of an international business and we discussed the book she was reading and her favorites she had read recently. As we are talking she said a phrase that I have heard over the years – Leaders are readers. I have also heard it said – Earners are learners. Regardless of how you say it, I have found that a great habit of the highly successful is that they are always reading and growing. There are four main reasons that leaders are readers. 1. Leaders read for Enlightenment. Books can be an amazing source of wisdom,
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Be Interested, Not Interesting

If you have read my book The Power of Influence or heard me speak you have heard me share the idea that we should focus on being interested, not interesting. Influence comes from making it about them and when we are genuinely interested in someone else they will love us for it. My friend John Milton Fogg (Author of The Greatest Networker in The World) told me a story the other day that illustrates this idea. Years ago the Editor of Psychology Today was writing a book. As part of his research, he purchased a first class ticket from New York City to Los Angeles. He knew he would sit next to someone on this six hour flight and his task was to only ask questions. He wouldn’t volunteer any information about himself, instead he would do his best to make the conversation all about them. When they landed in
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